How to Make Pre- During- and Post- Workout Shakes

Are you fueling your body with the right nutrients for your workout?

Proper nourishment is key to helping your body recover from a workout and making it stronger the next time around.

Here are some guidelines for preparing pre-workout, during-workout and post-workout shakes using our GN products.  The key to all of these recipes is to tailor it to your needs.  These are especially recommended if you are working out for longer than 60 minutes or at high intensities.   You should also consider taking a multivitamin/mineral supplement to help your body replenish its stores.

Prepare your body for a workout…

Without the proper fuel, your body might feel too tired to workout or become easily sore.  (This could also happen if your body is not accustomed to working out).  This recipe is recommended for activity > 60 minutes. Take 1-3 hours pre-workout.  You know your body best, so you know how soon after eating you can workout.   You can follow our recipe or put a twist on your own.  If you lean on the side of intense workouts, add the antioxidants and a little bit of fat for potent fuel.

For activity < 60 minutes—skip this recipe OR cut all ingredients in half except for the energizer.

Note:  If you’ve eaten a substantial meal/snack within the past 2 hours, you probably don’t need a pre-workout shake.  Also, please note the amount of caffeine in 1 tbsp. of your choice “boost” powder and make sure this is something your body can handle.  Adjust as needed. For reference, 1 cup of brewed coffee can contain ~150-200mg caffeine.

  preworkout shake

Endure the workout…

Fluids and electrolytes can be lost through sweat especially in hot and steamy conditions.  But not sweating doesn’t mean you’re not dehydrated.  For activity < 60-90 minutes the goal is to hydrate and replenish your electrolytes without ingesting the fuel your body is trying so hard to burn off—in other words, little to no calories for this recipe.

Drink this slowly and throughout the workout.  Don’t drown yourself or drink too quickly—this might give you a stomach cramp that’ll shorten your workout.

If your workout is light or < 60 minutes, stick to plain water, mineral water, or flavored water (if you’re into that stuff 🙂 ).

during workout1

On top of replenishing fluids and electrolytes, your beverage should include just a tiny bit of fuel (from carbs and protein) for activity > 60-90 minutes.  Also, add in some antioxidants if you’re going the extra, extra mile—go you!

during workout2

Recharge and recover (well) from your workout…

A good, intense work out can leave you sore in places you wouldn’t imagine—your body is wiped out! Rightfully so, this may make you dread the next workout.  Proper dietary recovery from your physical activity can minimize the soreness, while setting the stage for a better and stronger workout the next time around.  You might even look forward to it.

A post-workout shake can help to repair any damaged muscle tissue, replenish some fluid and electrolytes and help reduce the inflammation throughout your body.  But it should in no way replace a balanced full meal afterward (unless you make it substantial/nourishing enough).  For best results, take within an hour of being wiped out from your physical activity.

For lighter workouts, consider cutting this recipe in half.  Or just eat a well-balanced post-workout meal.

post workout

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